What’s new with the Dutch wagon house reconstruction? Plenty!

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Since our last update in November when we had just poured a new concrete foundation, our contractor, Lignum Vitae, has begun a multi-phase plan to restabilize the Dutch wagon house’s timber frame structure. Due to the weight of 3 layers of asphalt shingles on top of cedar shakes, moisture found inside the roof, and the fact that the entire structure was woefully under-built in the first place–the beams have pulled away from the sills, cracking the rafters, and resulting in a dangerously bowed-out frame. Timber frame repair is now underway in an effort to “pull the walls of the wagon house back together.”

Also, the building will be raised slightly so that it’s on the same level as the farmhouse, enabling easy access between the two. Lignum Vitae (with over 30 years in the building-moving business) is preparing the wagon house to be raised and repositioned against the farmhouse.

Here are some photos so you can see for yourself:

Dutch wagon house construction shown from northeast side
Dutch wagon house construction shown from northeast side
Shingles were removed by hand from the east side of the Wheeler House (at left) to show old clapboard underneath.
Shingles were removed by hand from the east side of the Wheeler House (at left) to show old clapboard underneath.
Grocery sign board discovered when asphalt shingles were removed from north wall roof of the wagon house.
Grocery sign board discovered when asphalt shingles were removed from north wall roof of the wagon house.
Archivist Gary Leveille and VP Robert Tepper renovated this barn for fundraising antique sales and flea markets.
Archivist Gary Leveille and VP Robert Tepper renovated this barn for fundraising antique sales and flea markets.

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